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How to Become a Business Analyst to Influence Company Decisions

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You want to become a business analyst, right?

It’s a brilliant career that allows individuals with interest in the inner-workings of business to influence company decisions.

If you enjoy:

  • Addressing complications
  • Devising accurate, data-driven processes
  • Facilitating fundamental changes
  • And influencing businesses positively…

Becoming a business analyst might just be for you. Here’s how to do it.

1. Begin with training and courses

Before committing to this career path, the internet offers courses and training to give insight into what is expected from a business analyst.

These courses provide an understanding of standard requirements and help you develop the necessary skills required for the position.

We have an entire list of online locations to get started.

Note that these courses will not give you the proper credentials to become a certified business analyst. That comes later.

Right now, these courses help to get your feet wet.

2. Start studying for the certifications

It’s not required, but people with bachelor degrees (B.As) have an easier time landing jobs. Especially if the degrees are within:

  • Computer science
  • Internet Technology
  • Accounting
  • Management Information Systems

You can also obtain certifications.

The two most popular certifications come from The International Institute of Business Analysis (IIBA) and The Institute of Management Consultants (IMC). However, work experience is required to do IMC’s basic course.

3. Get experience

A bachelor’s degree will help, as stated above. But you can obtain experience even without it.

It will take work. Recruiters see B.As as proof of concept that you know what you’re doing. But experience shouldn’t be thrust aside even if you don’t have a B.A.

You need to start getting involved with projects. You can start within the company where you work. There are bound to be projects available. It’s just about using your business analyst knowledge to get managers to say ‘Yes!’ to you.

You’re looking to complete tasks for the company so you can include this on your resume. You can also search online or accept freelance opportunities as well.

4. Continue advancing your skills

As a business analyst, you can’t just let your skills rot after becoming certified. Utilizing the tools at your side — previous training, digital tools, online resources — allows you to advance your methods.

Businesses fluctuate and require different means and approaches to sniff out issues and eradicate threats. It helps to understand what you’re looking for (including underlying causes to problems), and use tools and analyses. Then present your conclusions thoughtfully.

5. Find a mentor

A mentor is one of the best methods to learn essential skills as an analyst, while also potentially receiving opportunities to expand upon your experience.

If you want to learn from someone who will help you to not make the same mistakes they have, thus propelling you forward as a business analyst, a mentor is necessary.

Some training courses will help you find a mentor. Other times, you may have to dig deep into your connections — whether from past schooling or work experience.

6. Locate job opportunities

In Canada, business analyst employment opportunities are laid out for you here. In the U.S, you can follow similar methods.

Check online — on Indeed, Monster, and Glassdoor.

Look on LinkedIn for business analyst positions. Network on LinkedIn with others in the industries you want to expand in. Networking is everything, after all.

And don’t forget to look into opportunities at the company you work for. This point goes back into #3 of getting experience. Except now you’re not seeking to build your reputation, you’re on the lookout for a position in the business analyst role.

Look for opportunities everywhere.

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